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district on the city council went in a district 71% african-american to 30% african-american, and the only african-american member of the city council in that city in alabama lost his seat. so that to me seems like a perfect reason why we still need section 5. they drew the district in such a way that it resulted in the on black member of the city council losing his district. yes, this stuff happens in ohio and pennsylvania and wisconsin. but it happens more often, still, in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. and that's why section 5 so many different people across the legal spectrum are urging it be upheld. host: maverick rights in and says, the voting act law should expand to all states after seeing the obvious suppression attempts and tactics in the 2012 election. guest: well, if they are going to say it needs to be expanded, yes, that would then treat states the same. and particularly in terms of the evidence. ari keeps saying that there's more discrimination in covered states. that is simply not true. the facts do not bear that out at all. and if are you going to have sectio
have moved since 2007. a lot of cities have minimum wages that are a lot higher, often because the cost of living is a lot higher. but yes, states have acted unilaterally. they have looked at their industries and they have worked to do it to help low-income families. again, raising the minimum wage is mostly helping low- income families. teens, seniors, and others. host: the states with the lowest minimum wage, alabama, mississippi, tennessee -- they have no minimum wage. wyoming and georgia, $5.15. host: what do you make of those states? some southern states have no minimum wage. guest: i think the thing to remember is that those tend to be low-cost states to live in. that is probably part of this. they also tend to be states with high unemployment rates. generally, they tend to be more conservative. the politics of this is not easy. republicans have tended to resist minimum wage hikes and democrats have. the policy tends to get a bit complicated. host: what do of economists say that are for increasing the minimum wage? guest: economists say you're raising the minimum wage about as muc
that wisconsin is a state and that there are cities inside of it. if i say i like wisconsin there are a whole bunch of interest that passed it off of that. he need to understand that hierarchy of objects. you also need to understand how they relate to each other. >> does this personalization become complementary to search, does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide you with information. there's also a very powerful social component because we can show you interests you may have in common with peo
which are weapons of war, which don't belong in the neighborhoods of our cities and towns and high capacity ammunition whose only purpose is to kill a great number of people in a very short period of time. we have these very reasonable commonsense solutions which are available. last night at the president's state of the union, we had 30 victims who suffered the grievous impact of gun violence. who put a face on the devastation, the scourge of gun violence in this country. we owe it to them, we owe it to families all across this country to move on this legislation, to hold a vote, up or down, so woo can take what most americans support, responsible gun safety legislation to reduce gun violence in our country. when the gentlelady was just going through the examples of what the n.r.a. has been successful in doing, let's not forget, the n.r.a. doesn't have a vote in this chamber. so every single one of those actions happened because individuals in congress voted for them. they should be accountable for that. we could fix it by taking votes today to enhance public safety to impose reaso
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i just want someone's opinion on people my age and why we have so little put away. we are the generation of all the crises and the tail end of that . host: before we get a response from paul taylor, are you still with us? caller: >> i am. host: what has your savings patterns been over the last couple years? caller: i had to quit contributing to my 401k's just to get by with the rising cost of living from 2006 to present i went four years without a pay increase from my employers because they were in a financial struggle as well with the economic hit in 2007 and slow growth to 2009. we finally got a pay increase last year because of somewhat of a comeback in our industry. host: thank you. that age group is critical when it comes to your 401k pl
, but i was wondering how risky it might be to have a city -- a sitting president working for or raising money for a 501c4. >> i have not attempted to separate my comments -- i do represent organizing for action, which is the name of the organization you are referring to. i would simply say as you know, i will not be involved in electoral activity at all. to bet sense, it's not confused with activity in an election cycle, the types of concerns the campaign finance sector we're talking about here today. as you know, it is devoted to federal and state public policy and issue development advocacy. it will be operating therefore as a social welfare organization. without going into tremendous amount of discussion about people's views of the feasibility of such an enterprise, i would say this -- the business of communicating on issues in this country and involving one's self in the day- to-day business of grass-roots requires resources. the largest issue we all face is in a country of this size and complexity and even with developments like internet communications which have reduced the cost o
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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